Small-group training and one-to-one coaching for data visualisation and Bayesian analysis.


Future courses

Introduction to Bayesian Analysis Using Stan: Royal Statistical Society, 9-10 July 2019


9-10 July 2019
Introduction to Bayesian Analysis Using Stan


This two-day course is ideal for beginners or intermediate users of Bayesian modelling, who want to learn how to use Stan software within R (the material we cover can easily be applied to other Stan interfaces, such as Python or Julia). We will learn about constructing a Bayesian model in a flexible and transparent way, and the benefits of using a probabilistic programming language for this. The language in question, Stan, provides the fastest and most stable algorithms available today for fitting your model to your data. Participants will get lots of hands-on practice with real-life data, and lots of discussion time. We will also look at ways of validating, critiquing and improving your models.

Book here


Bayesian software: 1 hour taster webinars starting 18 February 2019


18 February 2019
Bayes Taster


This one hour webinar is aimed at anyone who has heard of Bayesian methods in statistics / data science / machine learning and wants to find out a little more.
Maybe you're starting a new job or project that might need Bayesian methods, or are managing a data team who will use them. You need an intuitive grasp of what it's about, what it does that's different to old-school stats or machine learning, and why it might make a difference to you and your organisation.
This webinar, delivered in plain English without code or algebra, is all about giving you that intuition and demystifying the subject.
Topics covered:

  • how Bayes differs from statistics and machine learning
  • why it is more flexible
  • how it can deal easily with tricky data
  • how it helps communication and influencing
  • what software is used and what skills a team needs to do it

Book here




1 March 2019
BUGS and JAGS Taster

This one-hour webinar is an introductory taster for the Bayesian data analysis software BUGS and JAGS. These are both free, open-source packages, widely used and trusted in many different settings. They are probabilistic programming languages, which simply means that you can build up a model for your data, and the parameters that interest you, from simple building blocks. They both use the Gibbs sampler algorithm to carry out estimation and inference, and have almost identical languages, which is whay they are bundled together here.

In this hour, you'll see how they both work through R and Python, as well as the Windows standalone interface WinBUGS. You'll see a few classic models, such as logistic regression, being written and run from scratch. There will be an opportunity for you to try out the code too, if you have the software loaded and tested ahead of time, and time for Q&A with Robert.
Book here



4 March 2019
Stan Taster

This one-hour webinar is an introductory taster for Stan, the Bayesian data analysis software. Stan is free, open-source, and widely used and trusted in many different settings. It is a probabilistic programming language, which simply means that you can build up a model for your data, and the parameters that interest you, from simple building blocks. Stan has a superior algorithm to BUGS and JAGS in most situations: it is faster and is less fussy about starting values and prior distributions. There are Stan interfaces for many different data analysis platforms.

In this hour, you'll see Stan at work through R, Python, and from the command line. You'll see a few classic models, such as logistic regression, being written and run from scratch. There will be an opportunity for you to try out the code too, if you have the software loaded and tested ahead of time, and time for Q&A with Robert.
Book here



8 March 2019
PyMC3 Taster

This one-hour webinar is an introductory taster for the Python package PyMC3 for Bayesian data analysis. PyMC3 is free, open-source software, widely used and trusted in many different settings. It provides you with a probabilistic programming language, which simply means that you can build up a model for your data, and the parameters that interest you, from simple building blocks. You can apply the same fast and stable algorithm used in Stan.

In this hour, you'll see how PyMC3 works as part of your Python workflow. You'll see a few classic models, such as logistic regression, being written and run from scratch. There will be an opportunity for you to try out the code too, if you have the software loaded and tested ahead of time, and time for Q&A with Robert.
Book here

Analysis For Data Visualisation: webinars starting 27 February 2019


27 February 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 1:
Data and summaries


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about choosing the individual data or a summary statistic, and if the latter, which to use. This is a crucial part of making good data visualisations, but often overlooked. It is not as simple as it seems, but you don't need a degree in mathematics or statistics to navigate the many options. This webinar presents the common sense approach, with demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here



6 March 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 2:
Smoothing and interpolation


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about getting a clearer message by smoothing out the bumps in your data, and filling in the gaps. This is like walking a tightrope: often, your audience will not see what's going on in a very complex pattern of data, but if you smooth it out too much, you can be accused of hiding the facts. This webinar tackles the dilemma head-on with demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here



13 March 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 3:
Predictive models


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about visualising a predictive model, where some statistical or machine learning method attempts to explain or predict one variable in terms of others. This is the central activity of much data science today. Medical researchers predict patients' response to cancer treatments, marketers predict return on investment for advertising campaigns, and self-driving car engineers use video data to predict whether the object in front is a puddle or a pedestrian.

This webinar sets aside technical details of the models and takes a generic approach based to predictions, errors, and cause and effect interpretations. There will be demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here



20 March 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 4:
Big data


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about Big Data: the increasingly common situation where you can't just open the data in your favourite software and make charts. We will look at the tools that big data analysts use, and discuss practical ways of tackling the problem so that you can get on with the visualisation that your audience needs. This webinar will include demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here



27 March 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 5:
Uncertainty


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about showing uncertainty in your data and predictions made from them. This is a crucial part of making good data visualisations, but often overlooked in data design classes. You don't need a degree in mathematics or statistics to navigate the options; we will look at simple approaches that give you results you can immediately use, as well as knowing when you need to call for expert help. This webinar presents a common sense approach, with demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here



3 April 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 6:
Time series


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about data that follow repeated events over time, like share prices, or weather observations. In this situation, the visualisation you make will depend on specific types of analysis that work with "time series" data. I'll walk you through the principles and how they impact on visualisations, without getting bogged down in mathematics. This webinar presents a common sense approach, with demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here



10 April 2019
Analysis for dataviz webinar 7:
High-dimensional data


This one-hour webinar is in a series of seven that aim to look at the calculations and analysis necessary for effective data visualisation. If you are involved in visualisation or trying to communicate complex messages, but have not studied statistics / data science, then this is for you!

Robert Grant, author of "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," will demonstrate the thought processes (creative and quantitative) behind making an effective image to convey your message.

This week's session is about visualising "high-dimensional" or "multivariate" data, where the challenge is showing differences across many variable all on a two-dimensional sheet of paper or computer screen. There are many options to try for this, none perfect, and all with pros and cons. You don't need a degree in mathematics or statistics to make a choice and be able to justify it. This webinar presents the common sense approach, with demonstrations, opportunities for you to try out your own sketches, and time for Q&A.
Book here


Stata courses with Timberlake: online and in London


15 February 2019
10 June 2019

Creating automated reports from Stata (online)


Participants will learn how to export outputs (text, tables and graphs) from Stata into Word, Excel, PDF and HTML. We also cover how to control the formatting to match your requirements. By the end of the course, all participants will feel comfortable undertaking the following tasks:

  • Convert text, tables, and graphics from Stata into word and PDF reports
  • Exporting data and results tables into Excel
  • Fine-tune style and formatting of reports from within Stata
  • Understand the benefits of HTML reports and generate these using Stata
  • Understand the potential for interactive content

Book here



11 March 2019 (1300-1700 GMT)
29 March 2019 (0900-1300 EST)
31 May 2019 (1700-2100 Dubai)
3 June 2019 (0900-1300 EST)
Stata Tricks


Online, various time zones

Beginners or occasional users of Stata who want to progress to writing more efficient and reliable programs will benefit from this course. You will learn how to save time and avoid errors. We will also share tips and tricks to get your programs to check for various potential problems, so that it carries on working with new data and requires less maintenance. We also look at how these techniques are especially valuable when applied to "big data".
You will learn how to save time and avoid errors by writing bespoke commands for your own use, getting Stata to loop through your data for repetitive work, and including automated checks to keep Stata running smoothly. By the end of the course, all participants will feel comfortable undertaking the following tasks:

  • Automating repetitive and time-consuming tasks
  • How to provide non-technical colleagues with a Stata analysis they can easily run
  • Using Stata’s loop functions to save you time and work with big data
  • Protecting your automated analysis against common data issues
  • Understand how to create your own Stata commands

Book here by time zone: Europe or Americas or Asia



10 May 2019
Introduction to Survival Analysis


Survival, or time-to-event, analysis has been widely used in biomedical research for decades but is also increasingly relevant to analysts working in fields like marketing, social sciences and engineering. Data follow people, organisations or other subjects over time and capture the times at which an event of interest happens. A cancer researcher may be watching for recurrence of a tumour, while in marketing, the event of interest could be a customer calling in to cancel their contract.
Stata has an established and trusted capability to manipulate such data and carry out a wide range of analyses. This half-day online course, delivered by experienced medical statistician Robert Grant, will introduce newcomers to the tools that Stata offers.
Topics covered:

  • Why survival / time-to-event data requires specific analyses
  • Defining and manipulating a survival / time-to-event dataset in Stata
  • Obtaining rates, survival and hazard curves from Stata
  • Testing for differences between groups in Stata
  • Adjusting for confounding variables in tests of hazard difference by stratification, using Stata
  • The role of regression in survival analysis, the difference between parametric and semi-parametric (Cox) models, and the basics of how to fit them in Stata

Book here



23 September 2019
Stata Autumn School, day 1:
Introduction to Bayesian analysis in Stata


Stata has rapidly built a selection of Bayesian data analysis tools since version 14. The release of version 16 (anticipated summer 2019) adds more to this. There are also existing community-contributed interfaces to WinBUGS, JAGS and Stan. This day at Stata Autumn School will introduce these options and give participants a grounding in what Bayesian analysis is and how it can be useful. Further details of material to be covered will be added following the release of version 16.
Book here



24 September 2019
Stata Autumn School, day 2:
Multivariate analysis and unsupervised learning in Stata


Finding patterns in datasets of many variables is a key skill in contemporary data science, whether you call it multivariate analysis or unsupervised learning. This day at Stata Autumn School will look at the many options available in Stata and give participants a grounding in choosing an appropriate method and critiquing results.
Topics covered:

  • Cluster analysis
  • Principal components analysis
  • Factor analysis and the link to structural equation models
  • Correspondence analysis
  • Procrustes analysis of shapes
  • Options for data visualisation

Book here



18-19 November 2019
Bayesian data analysis in Stata 16


Stata has rapidly built a selection of Bayesian data analysis tools since version 14. The release of version 16 (anticipated summer 2019) adds more to this. There are also existing community-contributed interfaces to WinBUGS, JAGS and Stan. This two-day workshop is for beginners in Bayesian methods, who want to understand how to fit models to their data and draw flexible inferences, all using Stata. Presenter Robert Grant is an experienced Stata user, trainer and medical statistician, who previously contributed the StataStan interface to Stan. Further details of material to be covered will be added following the release of version 16.
Book here



Dates to be confirmed soon:

  • What Is Machine Learning? A primer for anyone who studied statistics. Half day workshop, London.
  • Data Science, Statistics, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning: a primer for managers. One day workshop, London.
  • Analysis and Visualisation for Clinical Audit. One day workshop, London.
  • Introduction to Bayesian Meta-analysis. One day workshop, London.


You can also contact Robert at robert@bayescamp.com to discuss bespoke training for your team.



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